#freebooks – Let’s Learn ES6 by Ryan Christiani [Free Superbook]

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Synopsis

Get comfortable with new syntax.

Let’s Learn ES6 is a book meant to help developers understand the new syntax. Be able to comprehend Template literals, Generator functions, Promises, Maps and more.

Master new features faster and easier.

Now is the time to learn ES6, with more new features coming to JavaScript every year, getting ahead of the biggest update yet is important.

Become a more skilled JavaScript Developer.

With over 200 pages of content. This book will help you become a better developer, and allow you to review the features you want when you want.

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#freebooks – Would’ve been mum’s 61st birthday today. Here’s a book I wrote about her journey through early onset dementia. It’s free until the 24th. Her story matters.

Always Remember This: A fun little story about early onset dementia by [Heath, Jake]

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Have you ever loved someone so much, you wished they would die?

When you’re dealing with early onset dementia, you just might.

This story is about my mother Jacquie, who died three days before her 60th birthday. However, she died over and over again in front of us as we watched everything about her slowly disappear over a twelve-year timeframe.

It’s a fun little story that includes bits and pieces relating to suicide, euthanasia, motorbikes, and children’s books.

There’s also a celebrity cameo.

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#freebooks – [Kindle] Welcome to Hell. Free 6/20 – 6-24 [comedy]

Welcome to Hell: A Beginner's Guide to Soul Collection by [Winters, R.B.]

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Death: The end of life…and beginning of a whole new something else. Welcome to Hell! Join Guy Spencer and Lori Ryan as they are ripped from the restful slumber of confined coffins to discover they are the newest cogs in the bureaucracy of Heaven and Hell. As two of the newest Soul Collectors, it is their forced task to sway the living into signing over their immortal souls to meet monthly quotas. Noncompliance leads to the Lake of Fire and permanent termination. Compliance leads to an eternity of monotonous collect and repeat…or does it? Redemption, resurrection, reincarnation, as the reanimated dead anything is possible.

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#freebooks – My Smoking Hot Spanish Teacher: Part 4: Coming Together

My Smoking Hot Spanish Teacher: Part 4: Coming Together by [Strange, Jenny]

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Senora and Jake begin to appreciate each other’s bodies from afar and engage in some mutually satisfying playtime.

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#freebooks – Smoking Hot Spanish Teacher and Me: Part 3: Mutual Lessons

Smoking Hot Spanish Teacher and Me: Part 3: Mutual Lessons (My Smoking Hot Spanish Teacher) by [Strange, Jenny]

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Senora Liz and Jake decide to do some studying and drinking while in the master bedroom. Things get a little weird and a little dirty.
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#freebooks – How to Find a Job in the 21st Century – The Ultimate, NO B.S. Guide – FREE until June 21st

How to Find a Job in the 21st Century - The Ultimate, NO B.S. Guide to  Finding a Job With Social Media by [Paul, Benjamin]

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PRAISE FOR “HOW TO FIND A JOB IN THE 21ST CENTURY”

“This is a great book for those who are stuck in their own ways of searching for jobs. Times have changed and either you adapt or get left behind so go out and buy this funny, yet brilliant book about the new job market and how to market yourself and find a job.” – Martin

“The usefulness and utility of what Benjamin has presented here is undoubtedly of superb value! Everyone who reads this book and practices will benefit – whether a job seeker or others.” – BG

The employment landscape has definitely changed this century and your book is ON THE MONEY! Thanks! – Kitty

But How Do I Find a Job…?”

Looking for a NEW CAREER (but not sure how to get started)?

Wondering if the traditional resume is DEAD? Or at least in a COMA?

Not sure what to do – or how to do it – to achieve that full-time CAREER you’ve always wanted.

Then give:

“How to Find a Job in the 21st Century” a try!

In this no-nonsense guide, here’s what we’ll cover:

Chapter 1 goes over the “Ultimate Jedi Mind Trick for Job Seekers” – here we show a crucial set of mindset tricks that will help you understand what employers are REALLY looking for. (And it’s different from what you’ve heard before.)

Chapter 2 delves into the 6 Pillars of Job Search Awesomeness – this is where you find out the job seeker tools you will need to prime yourself for maximum job search awesomeness.

Chapter 3 helps you find out How to Conquer the World One Blog at a Time – this helps you lay the foundation for positioning yourself as a huge expert, even if you don’t know crap about your industry.

Chapter 4 delves into Your Job Search, 140 Characters at a Time – here’s where I show you the ins and outs of using Twitter, in just a couple minutes a day, to find and connect with employers and recruiters.

Chapter 5 shows you the Strange and Mysterious World of LinkedIn – this is where we pull back the curtain on this necessary but often misused part of your job search.

In Chapter 6 we go all Mark Zuckerberg by showing you How Facebook Can Help You Like Your Way to a New Job – Facebook gets a bad rap as a job seeking tool but here we’ll show you how, what and when to post on Facebook for the best job seeking effect.

In Chapter 7, we go all the way to 11 by showing you Super-Advanced Cool Ninja Job Search Tricks – these are so powerful, we saved ’em for the last chapter, but we’re sure you’re gonna love ’em and that they’ll provide your job search some much-needed juice.

..and there’s even a little bonus chapter!

So, if you’re still unsure HOW to find a job in these trying times, give

“How to Find a Job in the 21st Century”

a chance. (It just might change your life…and your bank account.)
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#freebooks – Old Milwaukee: The Early History of Brew Town in the 19th Century by Charles River Editors

Old Milwaukee: The Early History of Brew Town in the 19th Century by [Charles River Editors]

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“It is true, similar things [cultural events and societies] were done in other cities where the Forty-eighters [sic] had congregated. But so far as I know, nowhere did their influence so quickly impress itself upon the whole social atmosphere as in ‘German Athens of America’ as Milwaukee was called at the time.” – Carl Schurz, 1854

The area that became known as the Old Northwest caught the eye of European settlers as far back as the 17th century, when the French explorers Marquette and Jolliet found that waterways in the area connected the Mississippi River to the Great Lakes. The area was perfect for fur trade outposts long before it was settled by whites. Throughout the 19th century, American settlers pushing across the Western frontier came into contact with diverse American tribes, producing a series of conflicts ranging from the Great Plains to the Southwest, and from the Trail of Tears to the Pacific Northwest.

One of these notorious conflicts was the Black Hawk War, named after a Sauk chief who led a band of about 1,500 in a series of small battles fought in the Wisconsin territory in 1832. Black Hawk led his people east across the Mississippi River in an attempt to reclaim his people’s old lands in Illinois, and his defeat essentially ended all Native American resistance east of the Mississippi River and opened up the rest of Illinois and Wisconsin to white settlement. The war also provided an opportunity for some of the era’s most famous Americans to get military experience, including several U.S. Senators, several Territorial Governors, future Confederate President Jefferson Davis, and most famously, Abraham Lincoln.

Thus, it should come as no surprise that Milwaukee, the largest city in Wisconsin, has a history reflective of the Old Northwest. Known to the natives as a beautiful landscape at the mouth of a river on the edge of the Great Lakes, it did not take long for fur traders to join them in the serene location. Those fur traders, seeing a future city on the same spot as their sleepy trading post, worked to put the place on the map. Thanks to their vision and energy, Milwaukee transformed from a sleepy trading post to an industrial center, connected to the entire country and beyond through its industry and energy.
Given its background and location, the story of Milwaukee may have resembled other nearby cities like Detroit or Chicago, but Milwaukee would have its own flavors and characters thanks to the unique ethnicities and businesses that arrived early on. Before the beer capital of the country became Brew Town, it was Cream Town, and before that it was just a trading post, where some men with a dream came to live.

Old Milwaukee: The Early History of Brew Town in the 19th Century looks at the early history of one of the Midwest’s biggest cities. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Milwaukee like never before.
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#freebooks – Grizzly Adams: The Life of the Mountain Man Who Trained Bears and Other Wild Animals for the Circus by Charles River Editors

Grizzly Adams: The Life of the Mountain Man Who Trained Bears and Other Wild Animals for the Circus by [Charles River Editors]

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By the golden age of the mountain man in the mid-19th-century, there were perhaps only 3,000 living in the West. Their origins were disparate, although they included many Anglo-Americans. A good number hailed from wilderness regions of Kentucky and Virginia and throughout the newly purchased Louisiana Territory, which occupied the entire central section of the continent. French Canadians traveled from the north to work in the fur trade, while Creole-Europeans represented approximately 15% of the men known to be living the isolated mountain life. Others were of Métis, Spanish, American, Black, Indian, and mixed-blood origin, most often Iroquois or Delaware. Most came to the West in their late adolescent years, the oldest learning the trade in their 30s. Many roamed the west for as long as their constitutions would hold up under constant attacks on their health and personal safety. Some stayed too long and failed to survive the experience. Among the most famous, Jim Bridger arrived at the age of 16, while Edward Robinson was eventually killed in his 60s by what were known as “bad snakes,” a reference to the Snake tribe in Idaho country. Jim Beckwourth left the mountains at 68 and Old Bill Williams died at the age of 62 when a band of Utes “made him to come.”

In the same vein, Americans have always shared an ongoing fascination with what was for them the realm of the “exotic” in the collective imagination. Such a preoccupation with alternative experience extends to a preoccupation with pre-recorded history, as it did in the furor over the discovery of extinct dinosaurs’ first fossils. Similarly, stepping out of the familiar could satisfy the urge for both danger and wonder by contemplating the future, and the question of what might or might not exist. To this day, such a powerful imaginative force has underpinned the abundant science fiction and horror genres of modern films, including dramatic attempts at reviving and dominating massive and ancient beasts.

In the absence of cinematic technology, the 18th and 19th centuries nevertheless celebrated the extremes of their own environmental fantasies as American exploration moved westward to the Pacific coast. In the days preceding the Industrial Revolution, a wave of mania swept the populace with exhibitions of newly discovered cultures and animals, first in sparse venues offering single items of interest, and later in mobile caravans carrying the wonders of the world from town to town.

The first unveilings of exotic animals in early America were conducted by farmers who had by one means or another captured bear, deer, and mountain lions on their property. The venues for such showings were generally “rural taverns,” and the object was drink and amusement. Such viewings were not intended to elicit awe, but to demean the captured animal. The dancing bear was a standard feature of these meetings, with the once feared creature muzzled, forced to parade endlessly about on two feet, and humiliated. Monkeys, parrots, and other unfamiliar animals from overseas were brought by merchant seamen. Examples of larger species were as a rule captured and transported in their infancy. The first elephant came to American shores in 1796 as a calf to join African lions and Royal Bengal tigers from India.

Among the people who aimed to thrive in this deadly business, none became as famous or acclaimed as Grizzly Adams. Supplying the American portion of animal life from the West Coast for city audiences, Adams provided one of the “most amazing frontier biographies” in the mountain man era. The son of cotton mills and boot factories inexplicably went on to fame as a “wild animal fighter, collector and tamer.” Adams inspired every kind of similar show ever since.
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#freebooks – The ANZAC: The History and Legacy of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during the 20th Century by Charles River Editors

The ANZAC: The History and Legacy of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during the 20th Century by [Charles River Editors]

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A land of almost 3 million square miles has lain since time immemorial on the southern flank of the planet, so isolated that it remained almost entirely outside of European knowledge until 1770. From there, however, the subjugation of Australia and New Zealand would take place rapidly. Within 20 years of the first British settlements being established, the British presence in Terra Australis was secure, and no other major power was likely to mount a challenge. In 1815, Napoleon would be defeated at Waterloo, and soon afterwards would be standing on the barren cliffs of Saint Helena, staring across the limitless Atlantic. The French, without a fleet, were out of the picture, the Germans were yet to establish a unified state, let alone an overseas empire of any significance, and the Dutch were no longer counted among the top tier of European powers.

New Zealand and Australia lay at an enormous distance from London, so their administration was barely supervised. Thus, its development was slow in the beginning, and their importance remained narrowly defined, but as the 19th century progressed and peace took hold over Europe, things began to change. Immigration was steady, and the small spores of European habitation there steadily grew. At the same time, the Royal Navy found itself with enormous resources of men and ships at a time when there was no war to fight. British sailors were thus employed for survey and exploration work, and the great expanses of Australia attracted particular interest. It was an exciting time, and an exciting age, as the world was slowly coming under European sway, and Britain was rapidly emerging as its leader. Thanks to British actions there, and further imperialistic ventures in Africa in the 19th century, New Zealand and Australian soldiers would be used at home and abroad to fight on behalf of the British Empire, most notably during World War I.

Today, the ANZAC is best known for the controversial Gallipoli Campaign of World War I, fought against the defending Ottomans far away from the more memorable Western Front. Early in the war, the Ottomans knew the Dardanelles strait would most certainly be attacked and had prepared significant defenses. The plan drafted by the then First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, was meant to destroy Ottoman defenses along the Dardanelles. However, Allied forces troops were unable to penetrate the Ottoman defenses, advancing only about 100 meters from the shores. The Ottomans, led by German General Liman von Sanders, further reinforced their positions. The later attempt of the British to establish a new beachhead was more successful, yet the British government refused to send significant reinforcements.

The Gallipoli Campaign has been remembered as the Allies’ biggest disaster of the war. While some of the great battles like the Somme and Verdun saw greater bloodshed in a shorter period of time, the grueling conditions and hopelessness of the Allied position in the Dardanelles still holds the Western imagination, and as a result, the brutal fighting also helped forge the identity of Australia and New Zealand. Still in the process of finding themselves as independent countries, they created their national identity on the beaches of Gallipoli. The grit and endurance of the ANZAC soldiers is remembered fondly in both nations over 100 years later, and April 25 is celebrated as ANZAC Day in both nations.

Given their stellar legacy, it is little surprise that ANZAC soldiers were used by the British Empire for the next several decades, most notably in World War II, ensuring that even after the British Empire declined, the Australian and New Zealand troops’ contributions to the Commonwealth remain a source of pride.
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#freebooks – Portuguese Macau: The History and Legacy of the Autonomous Chinese Territory that Became the Last European Colony in Asia by Charles River Editors

Portuguese Macau: The History and Legacy of the Autonomous Chinese Territory that Became the Last European Colony in Asia by [Charles River Editors]

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The Portuguese explorer Jorge Álvares visited the Chinese coast in 1513 and was the first European to do so via the sea. Shortly after, more Portuguese visited around the Tunmen Inlet, which is believed to have been somewhere around the Pearl River Delta, and an establishment was set up there in 1514. At this time the Chinese knew nothing of the Portuguese other than their violent takeover of Malacca, a tributary to the Chinese Empire, so the Portuguese were treated with caution.

In 1516, Rafael Perestrello was dispatched from Malacca to the islands of Guangdong where his people were well received. Due to this favorable reception, more ships and trading vessels were sent the following year under the command of Perez de Andrade. The fleet anchored on the island Shang-chuan and was at first viewed with suspicion, given the frequent raids from Japanese pirates around the Guangdong region. However, Andrade was peaceful in his dealings with the Chinese and the Chinese allowed two of his ships to proceed to Guangzhou (Canton), while the others returned to Malacca or sailed up the coast with Chinese junks to other merchant factories. The peaceful interactions with the Portuguese was not to last for very long thanks to Andrade’s brother, Simão de Andrade, also known as Simon (Brinkley 1904: 170-142).

The Portuguese fleet that arrived in 1518 under the command of Andrade’s brother quickly turned to piracy, and the diplomatic relations between the Chinese and Portuguese deteriorated. At the time, an envoy was in Beijing, where they had been peacefully welcomed, but after hearing news of the actions of Portuguese (led by Simão de Andrade), the Chinese demanded of the visiting envoy that the Portuguese leave Malacca (since it was a tributary of China). The envoy refused and was thrown in prison, where one of the Portuguese diplomats was executed. The rest of the envoy was eventually shipped off to prison in Guangzhou.

The Portuguese would have completely lost their foothold in China were it not for the corruption and bribery that saturated the administrative system in Guangzhou (Smith 1920: 9). Despite the laws and regulations regarding dealings with foreigners, by 1537 three settlements had been established in the nearby region: Shang-chuan, Lang-peh-kao (Lampaçao), and Macau, which was established entirely on lies told to the Chinese. The Portuguese had told officials that tribute to the Chinese (which was in fact normal trading goods) had become wrecked in storms and needed to be dried. The Portuguese were allowed to erect sheds and structures for this purpose at Macau, but numerous merchants established themselves as tenants there and managed to pay the Chinese a yearly rent of 500 ounces of silver.

The location of Macau was beneficial and strategically chosen by the Portuguese, as it was in close communication with Guangzhou and connected via a river system. In contrast to their earlier dealings with the Chinese, the Portuguese attempted to appear more humble and comply with the wishes of the Chinese rather than with force. As it turned out, the policy, in conjunction with increased European activities in the region, would help the Portuguese Empire hold on to Macau even as its fortunes dwindled everywhere else across the world.

Portuguese Macau: The History and Legacy of the Autonomous Chinese Territory that Became the Last European Colony in Asia examines how this tiny foothold managed to last as a European possession for so long, and the dynamics that led to China establishing sovereignty over it at the end of the 20th century. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Macau like never before.

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